Parallel Sysplex Application Considerations

An IBM Redbooks publication

Note: This is publication is now archived. For reference only.

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Published on November 01, 2004

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ISBN-10: 0738424064
ISBN-13: 9780738424064
IBM Form #: SG24-6523-00


Authors: Franck Injey, Jordi Alastrue i Soler, Mark Anders, Karl Bender, Amardeep Bhattal, Paolo Bruni, Andy Clifton, John Iczkovits, Pirooz Joodi, Vasilis Karras, Andy Mitchelmore, Robert Queen, Mark Rader, Mayur Raja, Pete Siddall and Jens Erik Wendelboe

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    Abstract

    This IBM IBM Redbooks publication introduces a top-down architectural mindset that extends considerations of IBM z/OS Parallel Sysplex to the application level, and provides a broad understanding of the application development and migration considerations for IMS, DB2, Transactional VSAM, CICS, and MQ applications.

    Parallel computing and data sharing technologies are playing a major role in e-business computing. Despite their compelling capabilities, however, these technologies are virtually unknown within the application architect and developer communities and are deployed more like operational enhancement technologies, with limited application involvement. Parallel Sysplex deployment models often expressly attempt to segregate the application environment from the underlying environment.

    But today’s software engineering principles recommend that you view applications to be designed as the drivers for availability and data sharing requirements for any technology. This publication explains how to achieve this objective by designing applications to exploit the capabilities of Parallel Sysplex.

    Table of Contents

    Chapter 1. Introduction to Parallel Sysplex

    Chapter 2. Application design

    Chapter 3. DB2 application considerations

    Chapter 4. DFSMStvs application considerations

    Chapter 5. CICS application considerations

    Chapter 6. IMS application Considerations

    Chapter 7. WebSphere MQ application considerations

    Chapter 8. Implementation and migration

     

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